Review: Taliaschild

Taliaschild by Anastasia Vitsky
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

TaliaschildSix years after the mysterious talisman brought Queen Vina to Talia, it chooses a new owner in Sonna, a child of the streets. Unprotected by her amputee father and beaten by her mother for failing to bring home scraps for the family to eat, Sonna runs into the self-assured Kira, daughter and heir to Vina’s queendom.

Weary of endless rules and duties involved in training to become the future queen, Kira leaps at the chance to escape with a new friend. When she places the priceless talisman around Sonna’s neck, neither can remove the jewelry.

Alarmed at Kira losing the talisman’s protection, Vina and Talia take drastic steps to protect the princess. In the process, the entire earth descends into chaos.

Five years later, nineteen-year-old Sonna forages for two-day-old fish heads while dodging street pimps. The talisman leads her to the mysterious Nicodemus, who offers one command:

“Go to Kira. She needs you.”

Baffled, Sonna embarks on her journey. What can a pauper offer a spoiled princess? Will the street child end up surprising them all?

I thoroughly enjoyed this book, which is a sequel to Taliasman. Another story based on a fairytale, this time the Snow Queen, with a hint of Disney’s Frozen.

I thought the characters were excellent and I really liked Sonna, the street urchin. Kira was a bit of a spoilt brat but it was somewhat understandable.

I could have done without the visual of two-day-old fish heads but it certainly makes one appreciate access to plentiful, tasty, fresh food.

As is her wont, Ms. Vitsky likes to play with word choice and skip backwards and forwards in time, creating a believable world. Scenes are painted with enough description to imagine but leaving room to fill in the details yourself.

There is some spanking and love making at the end but it is sweet and innocent, rather like the girls themselves.

Another great book which is well worth checking out.

Taliaschild is now available for sale

I’ve downloaded and read it already and it’s fab 😃
I’ll post a review in a day or two.

Anastasia Vitsky

Happy Spoonmas Eve! Look what’s available at Amazon! I hear Taliaschild is available at iBooks as well. Let me know if you’ve found it.

Don’t forget to join the Facebook party! Click here for the link. Over thirty authors have come together to provide prizes, games, and fun. There will be special contests, guests, activities, and chances to win from a great pool of prizes.

Taliaschild-highres

Six years after the mysterious talisman brought Queen Vina to Talia, it chooses a new owner in Sonna, a child of the streets. Unprotected by her amputee father and beaten by her mother for failing to bring home scraps for the family to eat, Sonna runs into the self-assured Kira, daughter and heir to Vina’s queendom.

Weary of endless rules and duties involved in training to become the future queen, Kira leaps at the chance to escape with a new friend. When she places…

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Ette-ymology

I’m in full agreement. Let’s get rid of ‘ette’ altogether. Urg!

language: a feminist guide

Boy: hey dude!
Girl: I’m not a dude, I’m a girl.
Boy: OK, dudETTE!

The feminine suffix –ette is alive and well in the 21st century. It has several entries on Urban Dictionary (I’ve quoted one of them above), and I keep stumbling across it in unexpected places. Like the online magazine Gadgette,  ‘the smart woman’s guide to tech, style and life’. (‘Have you ever been talked down to about tech?’ the editors ask. ‘Offered the pink version of a laptop, or asked to flash your breasts to try a new smartwatch? We have’.) Or Stemettes, an organization dedicated to ‘showing the next generation that girls do Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths too’.

These are both feminist enterprises (though only Gadgette actually uses the f-word), and both deserve credit for tackling the problem of sexism in science and technology. But what are they doing with these twee, girly…

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Danika reviews Kicking the Habit: A Lesbian Nun Story by Jeanne Cordova

This looks interesting. Shame there’s no kindle version 😦

The Lesbrary

kicking

I will admit, I find the idea of lesbian nuns fascinating. I love that there are multiplebookson the subject. It actually makes total sense: historically, at least in the Western world, one of the few avenues that women had available to them if they didn’t want to get married to men and have children was to become a nun. Is it surprising that lesbians are over-represented in that number? In addition to this being a lesbian nun book, it’s also by an author I already enjoy. Cordova wrote a memoir about her activism titled When We Were Outlaws which I reviewed at the Lesbrary previously, so I knew that her writing style agree with me. It also ended up being an interesting prologue to When We Were Outlaws: I wouldn’t have guessed that passionate lesbian activist spent her childhood yearning to be a nun.

This…

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Evolution

Yep! Words matter a lot

In Others' Words...

I did then what I knew how to do. Now that I know better, I do better.

Maya Angelou

Someone posted a link to this article on Facebook this morning, and it caught my eye.  As many of you know, I lost my brother in law to suicide almost two and a half years ago.  The article dealt with the manner in which we talk about suicide.  Specifically, it focused on the expression “committing suicide.”  I imagine most of us have used that expression many times, and never thought about its origin.  The reason that “committed” is part of the expression, is that until fairly recently (the last fifty years or so) suicide was a crime.  As in, committed murder, committed armed robbery.

I will not dwell on the sheer jackassery of suicide being an illegal act, as though the notion of a jail sentence would deter someone who is…

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